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Who Buys Source

Average ages of participants for the 15 sporting activities with the highest rates of participation in 2010 (male/female): Exercise walking -- 46.0/45.0; Exercising with equipment -- 38.8/41.9; Swimming -- 30.1/32.9; Camping (vacation/overnight) --34.9/37.6; Bicycle riding -- 30.6/30.9; Bowling -- 29.5/31.1; Aerobic exercising -- 38.9/38.7; Hiking -- 36.0/37.4; Workout at club -- 39.1/41.2; Running/jogging -- 29.4/28.9; Fishing (fresh water) -- 37.3/36.5; Weightlifting -- 33.4/37.5; Basketball -- 23.9/22.0; Billiards/pool -- 34.5/35.1; Golf -- 40.6/42.5.

National Sporting Goods Association, 2011

For the top 40 sporting activities in terms of overall participation, among individuals age 7 and older in 2010, sports with the highest ratio of male participants: Tackle football (87.8%); hunting with firearms (85.7%); muzzleloading (82.6%); hunting w/bow & arrow (82.0%);  baseball (79.9%); ice hockey (79.1%); paintball games (77.0%); skateboarding (76.1%); golf (75.3%); target shooting (75.3%). Sports with the highest percentage of female participants: Yoga (79.6%); aerobic exercising (69.7%); exercise walking (61.3%); volleyball (55.1%); exercising with equipment (53.2%); swimming (52.6%); workout at club (51.8%); in-line roller skating (49.4%); hiking (49.0%).

National Sporting Goods Association, 2011

A study by the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association determined that more than 60% of Americans purchased fitness-related services or fitness equipment in 2010.

SGMA, 2011

Profiling adults 18+ who bought any sporting goods equipment/merchandise in the previous year:

GfK MRI, 2010

Of those adults 18+ who bought any sporting goods equipment/merchandise in the past year, 61.7% were men and 38.3% were women.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who purchased any sporting goods equipment/merchandise in the past year, by age level: 18-24, 12.1%; 25-34, 22.9%; 35-44, 25.8%; 45-54, 21.1%; 55-64, 11.0%; 65+, 7.1%.
 

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who bought any sporting goods equipment/merchandise in the previous year, by income bracket: $100,000+, 36.3%; $75-99,999, 18.1%; $60-74,999, 11.6%; $50-59,999, 8.4%; $40-49,999, 7.8%; $30-39,999, 7.3%; $20-29,999, 5.0%; under $20,000, 5.5%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who bought any sporting goods equipment/merchandise in the past year, by race: White, 82.9%; Black, 6.3%; Other, 10.8%; Hispanic origin, 11.0%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who bought any sporting goods equipment/merchandise in the previous year, by region: Northeast, 16.0%; Midwest, 24.5%; South, 35.9%; West, 23.6%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who bought any sporting goods equipment/merchandise in the past year, by marital status: Single, 23.9%; married, 64.9%; separated/widowed/divorced, 11.2%.
 

GfK MRI, 2010

With the exception of beach volleyball, slowpitch softball, rugby, touch football and paintball, team sports participation in the U.S. is dominated by players under the age of 24.

SGMA, 2010

Based on Scarborough Research, the top 10 metro areas in which reside adults who spent more than $100 on sports equipment in the previous year: 1. Sacramento/Stockton/Modesto; 2. Salt Lake City; 3. Boston; 4. Rochester (NY); 5. Denver; 6. Pittsburgh; 7. Colorado Springs/Pueblo; 8. Baltimore; 9. Seattle/Tacoma; 10. Knoxville.

Marketing Daily, 2010

While casual/pickup play is on the decline overall, there are four activities where more than 50% of their participants are casual/pickup players -- basketball, touch football, beach volleyball and grass volleyball.

SGMA, 2010

The five team sports which attract the largest percentage of participants in the 25-44 age group are roller hockey (55%), beach volleyball (47%), ice hockey (44%), slowpitch softball (43%) and rugby (42%).

SGMA, 2010

Sixty percent of all outdoor soccer players and 51% of indoor soccer players are under the age of 18. However, 24% of outdoor soccer players are over the age of 24.

SGMA, 2010

When They Buy Source

Sales of sporting goods stores, by monthly percentage (3-year average, 2008-2010): January, 6.4%; February, 6.4%; March, 8.1%; April, 8.0%; May, 8.6%; June, 9.1%; July, 8.8%; August, 9.4%; September, 7.5%; October, 6.9%; November, 7.9%; December, 12.9%.
 

U.S. Department of Commerce, 2011

Why They Buy Source

Based on a 2010 survey by the Leisure Trends Group, primary reasons for shopping a brick-and-mortar specialty sports retailer (as opposed to shopping online): Can physically see and feel the product, 93%; can try on the product, 88%; like supporting a local store, 66%; availability of expert advice, 61%; trust the store, 39%; like the environment, 34%; return policy, 34%; good selection and variety of products, 22%; easier to find merchandise, 17%; price, 8%.

Leisure Trends Group, 2010

According to a 2010 survey by BIGresearch, the top reason to shop a particular sporting goods store is price (52.7%), followed by location (36.0%); selection (35.9%), quality (27.4%) and trustworthiness of the retailer (15.5%).

BIGresearch, 2010

How They Buy Source

Based on research by the National Sporting Goods Association, average prices for the following sporting goods equipment in 2010 (with percentage change from 2005 in parentheses): In-line wheel skates, $59.89 (+13.8%); fishing rod-reel combos, $53.69 (+18.2%); treadmills (motorized), $681.40 (+7.2%); tennis rackets, $63.95 (+4.6%); gloves/mitts, $40.93 (+16.2%); soccer balls, $17.01 (+17.1%); footballs, $17.31 (+8.5%); game tables, $173.13 (-4.8%); multi-purpose home gyms, $640.22 (+10.4%); basketballs, $21.87 (+32.5%); skateboards, $56.34 (+13.6%); handguns, $466.36 (-1.2%); rifles, $496.77 (+12.8%); shotguns, $470.78 (+0.3%); stationary exercise bikes, $302.70 (+10.2%); elliptical/cross trainers, $600.09 (+18.9%); 1-2 person tents, $70.95 (+29.8%); hockey skates, $148.81 (+21.4%); metal/composite bats, $79.36 (+32.6%); sets of golf clubs, $369.09 (+14.6%); backpacks/daypacks, $38.39 (+30.9%).

NSGA, 2011

What They Buy Source

Top 10 sports activities in 2010, based on number of individuals age 7 and older who participated more than once during the year (totals in millions), with percentage change from 2009 in parentheses: 1. Exercise walking, 95.8 (+2.6); 2. Exercising with equipment, 55.3 (-3.4%); 3. Swimming, 51.9 (+3.4%); 4. Camping (vacation/overnight), 44.7 (-12.0%); 5. Bicycle riding, 39.8 (+4.3%); 6. Bowling, 39.0 (-13.3%); 7. Aerobic execising, 38.5 (+16.3%); 8. Hiking, 37.7 (+10.9%); 9. Workout at club, 36.3 (-5.3%); 10. Running/jogging, 35.5 (+10.3%). 

National Sporting Goods Association, 2011

The 11-20 most popular sports activities in 2010, based on number of individuals age 7 and older who participated more than once during the year (totals in millions), with change from 2009 in parentheses: 11. Fishing, 33.8 (2.8%); 12. Weight lifting, 31.5 (-8.8%); 13. Basketball, 26.9 (+10.1%); 14. Billiards/pool, 24.0 (+14.8%); 15. Golf, 21.9 (-2.0%); 16. Yoga, 20.2 (+28.1%); 17. Boating (motor/power), 20.0 (-16.2%); 18. Target shooting, 19.8% (+0.3%); 19. Hunting with firearms, 16.3 (-13.5%); 20. Soccer, 13.5 (-0.3%).

National Sporting Goods Association, 2011

Sporting activities registering the largest percentage increases in participation in 2010: Yoga, +28.1%; Gymnastics, +23.5%; Skiing (cross-country), +19.5%; Aerobic exercising, +16.3%; Billiards/pool, +14.8%; Kayaking, +14.8%; Tennis, +13.2%; Hiking, +10.9%; Running/jogging, +10.3%; Basketball, +10.1%; Baseball, +8.9%; Hockey (ice), +7.9%.

National Sporting Goods Association, 2011

Consumer sales of various categories of sports equipment in 2010 (totals in millions), with 2009 figures in parentheses: Archery, $444 ($411); baseball & softball, $447 ($381); basketball, $258 ($239); billiards & indoor games, $345 ($318); bowling, $155 ($155); camping, $1,700 ($1,469); exercise, $5,387 ($5,319); fishing tackle, $2,052 ($1,859); football, $87 ($85); golf, $3,197 ($2,927); helmets/sport protective gear, $206 ($191); hockey & ice skates, $167 ($168); hunting & firearms, $5,345 ($5,187); lacrosse, $41 ($32); optics, $1,259 ($1,135); racquetball, $28 ($28); skin diving & scuba gear, $345 ($343); snow skiing, $600 ($502); snowboarding, $303 ($291); soccer balls, $77 ($73); tennis, $417 ($378); volleyball & badminton, $37 ($35); wheel sports, $348 ($383); team goods sales, $2,591 ($2,566).

National Sporting Goods Association, 2011

According to research by the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association, participation in some "niche" sports activities experienced notable increases from 2009-2010: Rugby, up 50.7%; lacrosse, up 37.7%; field hockey, up 21.8%; and beach volleyball, up 12.3%.

SGMA, 2011

A 2010 survey by the Leisure Trends Group found that prior to purchasing their last item of sports, recreational or fitness equipment, apparel or footwear, 44% of consumers had a brand in mind they wanted to buy. When asked if they ended up buying that brand, 88% confirmed that they had.

Leisure Trends Group, 2010

Where They Buy Source

The U.S. retail sporting goods industry includes approximately 20,000 companies, including large chains such as Academy, Cabela's, Dick's Sporting Goods, Hibbett Sports, REI, and The Sports Authority. The industry is concentrated, however, with the 50 largest companies accounting for approximately 55% of industry revenues.

Hoover's, 2011

Based on research by the National Sporting Goods Association, share of overall sales of sporting equipment in 2010, by retail channel (with 2002 share in parentheses): Sporting goods stores, 32.6% (21.3%); specialty sport shops, 17.3% (16.6%); discount stores, 13.2% (18.0%); online/Internet, 12.5% (4.6%); department stores, 6.6% (17.2%); pro shops, 6.3% (8.5%); specialty fitness shops, 3.0% (2.4%); warehouse clubs, 2.2% (2.3%); gun show, 1.6% (0.2%); mail order, 1.0% (3.0%); other outlets, 3.7% (5.8%).

NSGA, 2011

A 2011 survey by BIGresearch asked consumers where they were most likely to shop for sports gear: 1. Wal-Mart; 2. Dick's; 3. Sports Authority; 4. Academy; 5. Big 5.

BIGresearch, 2011

Business Trends Source

Sales of sporting goods stores amounted to $39.098 billion in 2010, an increase of 5.1% over 2009 revenues of $37.189 billion. Sporting goods stores registered sales of $37.190 billion in 2008.
 

U.S. Department of Commerce, 2011

The National Sporting Goods Association predicts that overall sales of sporting goods will increase 2% in 2011.

NSGA, 2011

Sales for the outdoor industry grew 4.0% in 2010 to $10.85 billion, with outdoor footwear revenues increasing 1.9% to $2.12 billion, sales of outdoor apparel climbing 3.8% to $3.72 billion, and sales of outdoor hardgoods rising 5.0% to $5.01 billion. Sales attributed to outdoor specialty channels were up 7.3% in 2010 to $2.95 billion.

 

Outdoor Industry Association, 2011

According to research by the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association, more than 75 million Americans are involved in some type of athletic activitiy, recreational endeavor, team sport or exercise program on a fairly regular basis.

SGMA, 2010