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RAB Mobile
Who Buys Source

Profiling adults 18+ whose long distance bills are $60+ a month, in addition to those consumers whose long distance charges are less than $60:

GfK MRI, 2010

Of those adults 18+ whose long distance bills are $60+ a month, 53.1% are women and 46.9% are men.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance phone bills are $60+ per month, by age group: 18-24, 7.5%; 25-34, 13.7%; 35-44, 21.5%; 45-54, 22.1%; 55-64, 19.5%; 65+, 15.7%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance bills are $60+ a month, by income bracket: $100,000+, 35.7%; $75-99,999, 16.0%; $60-74,999, 9.2%; $50-59,999, 7.2%; $40-49,999, 7.0%; $30-39,999, 8.8%; $20-29,999, 6.2%; under $20,000, 9.9%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance bills are $60+ a month, by race: White, 69.0%; Black, 15.7%; Other, 15.3%; Hispanic origin, 13.4%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance bills are $60+ a month, by region: Northeast, 23.6%; Midwest, 15.5%; South, 39.7%; West, 21.2%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance bills are $60+ a month, by marital status: Single, 17.8%; married, 64.5%; separated/widowed/divorced, 17.7%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Of those adults 18+ whose long distance bills run less than $60 per month, 51.9% are women and 48.1% are men.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance charges are less than $60 per month, by age range: 18-24, 8.1%; 25-34, 13.5%; 35-44, 19.5%; 45-54, 23.2%; 55-64, 17.0%; 65+, 18.7%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance bills run less than $60 a month, by income level: $100,000+, 29.3%; $75-99,999, 14.8%; $60-74,999, 11.5%; $50-59,999, 8.3%; $40-49,999, 8.2%; $30-39,999, 8.7%; $20-29,999, 8.8%; under $20,000, 10.4%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance bills total less than $60 per month, by race: White, 79.5%; Black, 9.4%; Other, 11.1%; Hispanic origin, 11.0%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance bills run less than $60 per month, by region: Northeast, 18.3%; Midwest, 23.1%; South, 35.4%; West, 23.2%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ whose long distance bills are less than $60 per month, by marital status: Single, 19.3%; married, 62.0%; separated/widowed/divorced, 18.7%.

GfK MRI, 2010

As of November 2007, 94.9% of U.S. households had telephone service, compared to 92.9% in November 2005 and 94.7% in November 2003.

Federal Communications Commission, 2008

According to a 2008 Harris Interactive survey, only 9% of U.S. adults use a landline phone exclusively (down from 18% in 2006).

Harris Interactive, 2008

A 2007 study by Telephia found that 49% of households who have moved recently have chosen non-traditional residential phone options, such as using their wireless carrier or cable MSO exclusively. Recent-mover households tend to be young and have lower overall household incomes than those households that have not moved recently, according to the report. 

Telephia, 2007

According to a study by Scarborough Research, Hispanics are 95% more likely than the average consumer to have spent $100 or more on long distance service in the past month.

Scarborough Research, 2007

When They Buy Source

Distribution of residential long distance calls in 2005, by days of the week: Monday, 14.6%; Tuesday, 13.6%; Wednesday, 13.8%; Thursday, 14.1%; Friday, 13.0%; Saturday, 13.7%; Sunday, 17.2%.

Federal Communications Commission, 2007

Distribution of residential long distance calls in 2005, by time of day: 7 AM-6:59 PM, 64.0%; 7 PM-6:59 AM, 36.0%.

Federal Communications Commission, 2007

Why They Buy Source

According to a 2008 study by J.D. Power and Associates, factors that most influence business customer satisfaction with local phone service providers: Performance and reliability; sales representatives/account executives; billing; cost of service; offerings and promotions; and customer service.

J.D. Power and Associates, 2008

Factors that most impact customer satisfaction with those companies who provide bundled local and long distance services (in order of importance): Performance and reliability; customer service; billing; company image; cost of service; and offerings and promotions.

J.D. Power and Associates, 2007

According to a survey of business customers, conducted by J.D. Power and Associates, 11% of small/midsize companies and 14% of large businesses switched local telephone service providers in 2007, up from a combined average of 7% in 2006. Better prices or discounted rates were identified as the main reasons for switching among small/midsize customers, while reliable service was most often cited among the larger businesses.

J.D. Power and Associates, 2007

According to a 2006 Harris Interactive survey of consumers who always plan to maintain landline phone service (as opposed to going entirely wireless), 37% cite the ability to place calls during power outages as a reason, 31% say they'll keep it for the ability to place 911 calls, 31% cite a strong network/no dropped calls, and 25% mention the ability to always get a dial tone.

Harris Interactive, 2006

How They Buy Source

In 2006, the average monthly charge for a single business line in U.S. urban areas was $45.31, compared to $43.49 in 2004 and $41.95 in 2002. The average connection charge for a business line was $72.26 in 2006.
 

Federal Communications Commission, 2007

In 2006, the average residential rate for local phone service in U.S. urban areas was $25.27, compared to $24.52 in 2004 and $24.07 in 2002. The average price for connecting residential phone service in 2006 was $42.92.
 

Federal Communications Commission, 2007

What They Buy Source

The average duration of a residential long distance call in 2005 was 5.4 minutes for intrastate calls and 8.8 minutes for interstate conversations.

Federal Communications Commission, 2007

Where They Buy Source

As of November, 2007, states with the lowest percentage of households with telephone service: Indiana, 88.6%; South Carolina, 88.9%; Mississippi, 90.6%; New Mexico, 91.3%; Arizona, 91.6%; Arkansas, 91.9%; District of Columbia, 92.0%; Alabama, 92.1%; Tennessee, 92.1%; Texas, 92.5%. 

Federal Communications Commission, 2008

As of November 2007, states with the highest percentage of households with telephone service:  North Dakota, 98.5%; Minnesota, 97.8%; South Dakota, 97.7%; Connecticut, 97.6%; Pennsylvania, 97.6%; New Hampshire, 97.5%; Colorado, 97.0%; Massachusetts, 97.0%; Alaska, 96.9%; Iowa, 96.9%. 

Federal Communications Commission, 2008

According to a 2008 study by Compete, 35% of cable and phone company customers are interested in subscribing to cellphone services from the same company.

Research Alert, 2008

States with the largest penetration of local service by competitive local exchange carriers (CLECs) as of mid-2006: Rhode Island, 43%; South Dakota, 33%; Arizona, 30%; New York, 27%; Nebraska, 27%; Alaska, 26%; Kansas, 24%; Massachusetts, 24%; New Hampshire, 24%; Utah, 24%; Minnesota, 23%; Virginia, 22%. 

Federal Communications Commission, 2007

Business Trends Source

A 2008 study by SNL Kagan concluded that traditional telephone companies' share of the residential phone market dropped from 90% to 74% over the previous two years, and will shrink to 51% by 2012. Making the biggest inroads among competitors are cable operators, whose IP (Internet Protocol) voice services are expected to control 26% of the market in 2012.

Online Media Daily, 2008

As of mid-2006, incumbent local exchange carriers (ILECs) owned 82.7% of the local telephone lines nationwide, while competitive local exchange carriers (CLECs) claimed the remaining 17.3%. The share for CLECs was only 4.3% at the end of 1999, before climbing as high as 19.1% in mid-2005.

Federal Communications Commission, 2007

Misc Source

According to the J.D. Power and Associates 2007 Residential Regional Telephone Customer Survey, which measures customer satisfaction with both local and long-distance service providers, the companies ranking highest in six U.S. regions: Northeast -- Cox Communications; Mid-Atlantic -- Cablevision; Southeast -- Bright House Networks; North Central -- WideOpenWest; Southwest -- Cox Communications; West -- Cox Communications.

J.D. Power and Associates, 2007

As of December 2006, there were 23,466,561 working toll-free numbers (800, 888, 877, 866) in the U.S., compared to 24,200,111 at the end of 2000.

Federal Communications Commission, 2007