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Who Buys Source

The age distribution of U.S. farm householders in 2008: 15-34, 4%; 35-54, 35%; 55-64, 30%; 65+, 31%.

Economic Research Service, 2010

According to the Economic Research Service, 89% of principal farm operators in the U.S. are male, and 11% are female (up from less than 5% as recently as 25 years ago). Approximately 40% of farms report more than one operator, and in most cases, the additional operators are women. When all operators are considered -- not just the single principal operator of a farm -- more than 30% of U.S. farm operators are women.

Economic Research Service, 2010

The educational attainment of U.S. farm operators in 2008: Less than high school graduate, 8%; high school and/or some college, 68%; bachelor's degree or more, 24%.

Economic Research Service, 2010

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, over 1.3 million residential farmers (a farmer who reports a major occupation other than farming) exist in the U.S., which is nearly two-thirds of all farmers and almost a 10% increase from 1998.

AgriMarketing, 2010

Beginning farmers, defined as those with 10 years or less experience in running a farm or ranch, accounted for 21% of all family farm operators in the U.S. in 2008.

Economic Research Service, 2010

The average size of a residential farm is 160 acres, compared to 1,600 acres for an average commercial operation.

AgriMarketing, 2010




What They Buy Source

Sales of 2-wheel-drive farming tractors under 40 horsepower were down 20% in 2009, while sales of tractors from 40-100 HP fell 29%. Sales of 2-wheel-drive tractors over 100 HP were off 13% for the year, while sales of 4-wheel-drive tractors increased 2%. Sales of combines were also up in 2009, by 15%.

Association of Equipment Manufacturers, 2010

Through the first nine months of 2010, sales of two-wheel drive tractors were running 2.1% ahead of the previous year, while sales of four-wheel drive tractors were 18.3% ahead of the first nine months of 2009. Sales of self-propelled combines were up 3.5% for the same period.

Association of Equipment Manufacturers, 2010

Overall farm production expenses decreased 6.4% in 2009. Among the major categories, average spending on fuel per farm was down 22.4%, spending on feed decreased 4.0%, spending on farm services declined 4.2%, and the average costs for fertilizer, lime and soil conditioners were down 10.7%.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2010

According to a 2010 survey by Rabobank America, one in three farms expect to purchase farm equipment during the coming year.

Rabobank America, 2010

Where They Buy Source

States with the greatest number of farms in 2009: 1. Texas, 247,500; 2. Missouri, 108,000; 3. Iowa, 92,600; 4. Oklahoma, 86,500; 5. Kentucky, 85,500; 6. Califonia, 81,500; 7. Minnesota, 81,000; 8. Tennessee, 78,700; 9. Wisconsin, 81,000; 10. Illinois, 75,800; 11. Ohio, 74,900; 12. Kansas, 65,500; 13. Pennsylvania, 63,200; 14. Indiana, 61,500; 15. Michigan, 54,800.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

States with the largest amount of land devoted to farming in 2009 (millions of acres): 1. Texas, 130.5.7; 2. Montana, 60.8; 3. Kansas, 46.2; 4. Nebraska, 45.6; 5. South Dakota, 43.7; 6. New Mexico, 43.0; 7. North Dakota, 39.6; 8. Oklahoma, 35.1; 9. Colorado, 31.3; 10. Iowa, 30.8; 11. Wyoming, 30.2; 12. Missouri, 29.1.
 

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

States generating the most revenue from the sale of cattle and calves in 2009 (totals in billions): 1. Texas, $6.957; 2. Nebraska, $6.251; 3. Kansas, $5.559; 4. Colorado, $2.613; 5. Iowa, $2.479; 6. Oklahoma, $2.246; 7. California, $1.686; 8. South Dakota, $1.565; 9. Missouri, $1.273; 10. Minnesota, $1.002.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

States registering the largest amount of sales of hogs and pigs in 2009 (totals in millions): 1. Iowa, $4,431.0; 2. North Carolina, $1,879.0; 3. Minnesota, $1,663.4; 4. Illinois, $952.8; 5. Indiana, $834.8; 6. Missouri, $767.3; 7. Nebraska, $658.0; 8. Oklahoma, $511.5; 9. Ohio, $418.9; 10. Kansas, $365.4.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

States with the highest amount of sales of sheep and lambs in 2009 (totals in millions): 1. Colorado, $98.2; 2. Texas, $38.2; 3. California, $37.6; 4. Wyoming, $36.4; 5. Iowa, $23.8; 6. South Dakota, $22.1; 7. Montana, $19.0; 8. Utah, $18.3; 9. Idaho, $16.8; 10. Minnesota, $15.8.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Top egg-producing states in 2009 (totals in billions): 1. Iowa, 14.475; 2. Ohio, 7.392; 3. Pennsylvania, 6.509; 4. Indiana, 6.469; 5. California, 5.304; 6. Texas, 4.985; 7. Georgia, 4.467; 8. North Carolina, 3.148; 9. Arkansas, 2.935; 10. Michigan, 2.784.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

States producing the most broilers in 2009 (totals in millions): 1. Georgia, 1,322.0; 2. Arkansas, 1,050.9; 3. Alabama, 1,002.3; 4. Mississippi, 793.4; 5. North Carolina, 759.6; 6. Texas, 668.7; 7. Kentucky, 307.0; 8. Maryland, 291.9; 9. Virginia, 240.8; 10. South Carolina, 237.8.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

States raising the greatest number of turkeys in 2009 (totals in millions): 1. Minnesota, 45.0; 2. North Carolina, 35.5; 3. Arkansas, 29.0; 4. Missouri, 18.5; 5. Virginia, 17.0; 6. (tie) California and Indiana, 15.0; 8. South Carolina, 11.9; 9. Pennsylvania, 9.0; 10. Ohio, 5.2.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Leading states for the production of milk in 2009 (based on value in billions of dollars): 1. California, $4.540; 2. Wisconsin, $3.306; 3. New York, $1.690; 4. Pennsylvania, $1.519; 5. Idaho, $1.434; 6. Minnesota, $1.209; 7. Texas, $1.176; 8. Michigan, $1.068; 9. New Mexico, $0.956; 10. Ohio, $0.732.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Leading states for the production of tobacco in 2009 (based on millions of pounds): 1. North Carolina, 423.9; 2. Kentucky, 206.9; 3. Tennessee, 50.0; 4. Virginia, 47.4; 5. South Carolina, 38.9; 6. Georgia, 28.0; 7. Pennsylvania, 18.7; 8. Ohio, 6.8.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Top states for the production of rice in 2009 (based on million hundredweight): 1. Arkansas, 99.924; 2. California, 47.804; 3. Louisiana, 29.217; 4. Mississippi, 16.281; 5. Missouri, 13.423; 6. Texas, 13.201.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Leading states for the production of peanuts in 2009 (based on millions of pounds): 1. Georgia, 1,782,7; 2. Texas, 542.5; 3. Alabama, 471.2; 4. Florida, 336.0; 5. North Carolina, 244.2; 6. South Carolina, 148.8; 7. Mississippi, 54.0; 8. Virginia, 44.4.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Top states for the production of barley in 2009 (based on millions of bushels): 1. North Dakota, 79.100; 2. Idaho, 48.450; 3. Montana, 41.040; 4. Colorado, 10.395; 5. Wyoming, 6.720; 6. Washington, 6.208; 7. Arizona, 5.175; 8. Minnesota, 4.880; 9. Pennsylvania, 3.375; 10. Maryland, 3.360.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Leading states for the production of potatoes in 2009 (based on million hundredweight): 1. Idaho, 131.0; 2. Washington, 88.5; 3. Wisconsin, 29.0; 4. Colorado, 23.7; 5. Oregon, 21.5; 6. Minnesota, 20.7; 7. North Dakota, 19.1; 8. Michigan, 15.7.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Top states for the production of corn for grain in 2009 (based on millions of bushels): 1. Iowa, 2,438.8; 2. Illinois, 2,065.0; 3. Nebraska, 1,575.3; 4. Minnesota, 1,251.3; 5. Indiana, 933.7; 6. South Dakota, 719.1; 7. Kansas, 598.3; 8. Ohio, 546.4; 9. Wisconsin, 448.3; 10. Missouri, 446.8.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Top states for the production of wheat in 2009 (based on millions of bushels): 1. North Dakota, 377.2; 2. Kansas, 369.6; 3. Montana, 176.6; 4. South Dakota, 129.1; 5. Washington, 123.1; 6. Colorado, 100.6; 7. Idaho, 99.1; 8. Minnesota, 84.2; 9. Oklahoma, 77.0; 10. Nebraska, 76.8.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Leading states for the production of hay in 2009 (based on millions of tons): 1. California, 8.632; 2. Texas, 8.250; 3. Missouri, 8.040; 4. South Dakota, 7.830; 5. Kansas, 7.225; 6. Kentucky, 6.290; 7. Nebraska, 6.235; 8. Idaho, 5.528; 9. Oklahoma, 5.278; 10. North Dakota, 5.240. 

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Top states for the production of oats in 2009 (based on millions of bushels): 1. Wisconsin, 13.260; 2. Minnesota, 12.070; 3. North Dakota, 11.220; 4. South Dakota, 6.570; 5. Iowa, 6.175; 6. Pennsylvania, 4.880; 7. New York, 4.620; 8. Michigan, 3.465; 9. Ohio, 3.375; 10. California, 3.150.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Leading states for the production of soybeans in 2009 (based on millions of bushels): 1. Iowa, 486.0; 2. Illinois, 430.1; 3. Minnesota, 284.8; 4. Indiana, 266.6; 5. Nebraska, 259.4; 6. Missouri, 230.6; 7. Ohio, 222.0; 8. South Dakota, 176.0; 9. Kansas, 160.6; 10. Arkansas, 122.7.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Top states for the production of cotton in 2009 (based on millions of bales): 1. Texas, 4,932.0; 2. Georgia, 1,820.0; 3. Arkansas, 830.0; 4. North Carolina, 760.0; 5. California, 600.0; 6. Missouri, 520.0; 7. Tennessee, 500.0; 8. Arizona, 444.0; 9. Mississippi, 425.0; 10. Louisiana, 340.0.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Business Trends Source

The number of farms in the U.S. decreased slightly in 2009 to 2,200,010, down from 2,200,100 in 2008. In 1999, there were 2,187,280 farms in America.
 

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

The amount of land devoted to farming also dropped slightly in 2009 to 919,800,000 acres, continuing a gradual decline that has occurred in recent years.  In 1999, there were 948,460,000 acres of farmland in the U.S.
 

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

The size of the average farm in America has gotten smaller in recent years. In 2009, it was 418 acres, compared to 441 acres in 2004 and 434 acres in 1999.

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

The number of farms in the U.S., according to sales totals in 2009: Less than $10,000, 55.8%; $10,000-$99,999, 27.2%; more than $100,000, 17.0%.

Economic Research Service, 2010

States with the largest average farm size (number of acres) in 2009: 1. Wyoming, 2,745; 2. New Mexico, 2,098; 3. Montana, 2,040; 4. Nevada, 1,916; 5. Arizona, 1,684; 6. South Dakota, 1,387; 7. Alaska, 1,294; 8. North Dakota, 1,238; 9. Nebraska, 966; 10. Colorado, 865.
 

National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010

Net farm income is predicted to increase 24% in 2010 to $77.1 billion, up from $62.2 billion in 2009. The $77.1 billion forecast would rank as the fourth largest amount of income earned in U.S. farming. The top five earning years have occurred since 2004, attesting to the profitability of farming during the decade.

Economic Research Service, 2010

According to a 2010 survey by the National Association of Farm Broadcasting, which medium is farmers' first choice for obtaining daily information that pertains to running their farming and/or ranching operations: Radio, 51.7%; Internet sources, 21.8%; Data Transmission Network satellite, 10.4%; TV, 7.3%; farm magazines, 4.0%; farm newspapers, 3.8%; other sources, 1.0%.

AgriMarketing, 2010

Production expenses for U.S. farmers fell 6.4% in 2009 -- the first major decline in almost 25 years. The average production expenditures per farm dropped from a record high of $140,075 in 2008 to $131,137 in 2009.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2010

Research by the U.S. Department of Agriculture revealed that the number of farmers markets in the U.S. grew 16% between 2009 and 2010, to more than 6,100.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2010

Agriculture loans at farm banks (defined as community banks with more than 14% of their total loans dedicated to agriculture) grew 6.1% in 2009, while deposits increased 7.5%. According to the American Bankers Association, there are 2,295 farm banks in the U.S.

American Bankers Association, 2010

A survey by the U.S. Department of Agriculture counted 14,540 farms and ranches in 2008 that were either USDA-certified organic or were exempt from certification because their sales totaled less than $5,000. Twenty percent of these operations were in California. The study also showed that most organic producers sold their products locally, with 44% of sales taking place less than 100 miles from the farm.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2010

A 2010 survey by Rabobank America showed that more than 70% of U.S. farmers and ranchers have taken steps toward implementing sustainable agricultural practices such as direct seeding, minimizing the use of chemicals, employing crop rotation, and utilizing alternative energy sources. The survey also found that those who were most likely to have taken such steps were tenant farmers (80%), row-crop farmers (79%), farmers in the Western region (77%), farms with gross incomes of $1 million or more (77%), farms run by someone under the age of 40 (76%), farms with more than 3 employees (74%), and dairy producers (73%). 

Rabobank America, 2010

Misc Source

Today, the average U.S farmer feeds 155 people. In 1960, a farmer fed just 26 people.

AgriMarketing, 2010