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Who Buys Source

Using 2005 population figures, the percentage of the following ethnic categories whose population is under 18 years of age: White (non-Hispanic), 23.3%; African American, 30.9%; Hispanic, 34.3%; Asian, 22.8%.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2007

According to a 2007 study by Alloy Access, more than five million teens age 12-17 can be identified as "urban hustlers" -- a state of mind that includes a desire to succeed, live a hip-hoop lifestyle and possess a great passion for fashion. Individuals in this group spend nearly $80 more per month than other teens, with 25% living in suburban areas. One-third of "urban hustlers" are White, 29% are Black and an equal percentage are Hispanic.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

Based on a 2007 survey by Teenage Research Unlimited, items purchased within the past three months by "serious" high school athletes (boys or girls who play at least three sports), with frequency of purchase by students who don't participate in sports in parentheses: Jeans, 75% (46%); basketball shoes, 67% (18%); athletic wear, 63% (18%); casual shoes, 61% (36%); running shoes, 38% (14%); khaki pants, 30% (22%); hiking boots, 15% (14%). 

Teenage Research Unlimited, 2007

According to a study by EPM Communications, 38% of kids ages 15-17 are non-White or Hispanic.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

A 2007 study by Arbitron showed that teens go to the movies with an average of 2.9 people, the most of any age group.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

When They Buy Source

According to a 2008 study by MultiMedia Intelligence, the third and fourth quarters of each year are typically the strongest sales periods for sales of cellphones to teens.

Online Media Daily, 2008

Based on a survey by Directions Research, the age that parents believe their children can begin shopping for clothing on their own: 6-10 years, 17.6%; 11-12 years, 13.9%; 13-15 years, 37.0%; 16+ years, 31.5%.

USA Today, 2006

Why They Buy Source

A 2007 study by EPM Communications revealed that teens spend as much as 10% of their disposable income on gifts for friends and family.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

Based on a survey conducted by State Farm Insurance and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, primary reasons why teens drive a vehicle (multiple answers): To go shopping or run errands, 75%; to go out with friends, 64%; to relax, 60%; to get to school or work, 57%; drive without a place to go, 51%.

Research Alert, 2007

How They Buy Source

A 2008 survey from OTX and the Intelligence Group determined that teens who are making purchases online spend an average of $46 a month, with 26% spending $50 or more.

The Center for Media Research, 2008

Based on a 2007 survey by BizRate Research, the average teen has $178.09 per month in disposable income.

BizRate.com, 2007

Sources of teen spending: Money from parents, 71.0%; teens' income from jobs, 19.7%; allowance, 9.3%. 

Harrison Group, 2007

How teens pay for online purchases: Parents' credit card, 58%; Paypal-like services, 11%; own debit card, 11%; online gift certificate, 7%; own credit card, 3%; other, 9%.

Teenage Research Unlimited, 2007

The National Retail Federation predicted that the average amount of their own money spent on back-to-school items by teens in 2007 was $31.19.

National Retail Federation, 2007

A Spring 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray & Co. determined that overall spending on teen fashion products (including apparel, shoes and accessories), when compared to the previous year, was down 19% for young men and 6% for young women. However, spending on clothing still accounted for 44% of the total teen budget in Spring 2007, compared to 41% in 2006. 

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

According to a 2007 survey of parents of teens, 63% of the respondents said their teens had savings accounts, 42% indicated that their teens write checks, and 21% said their teens had credit cards in their own name.

BizRate.com, 2007

A study by the Consumer Electronics Association found that the average adult with a teen in the household spent $1,752 on consumer electronic products in 2006, more than $500 over the national average for all households.

Consumer Electronics Association, 2007

A 2007 study by Forrester Research revealed that 40% of teens regularly look at online product reviews before making purchases.

Forrester Research, 2007

According to a 2007 online survey conducted by eSpin, teens say that $200 is the right amount both boys and girls should spend on their prom outfits. 

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

Sources of spending money for teens (ages 13-18) (multiple answers): Job, 57%; gifts, 47%; allowance tied to chores, 35%; allowance not tied to chores, 28%; parents' credit or debit card, 20%; own credit or debit card, 14%; borrowing from others, 11%; selling things, 9%.

Charles Schwab Foundation, 2006

According to a 2006 survey of teens 13-18+, conducted by Junior Achievement, the percentage of the respondents' purchases that are paid for with their own money: Less than 15%, 22.7%; 15-25%, 22.6%; 26-50%, 16.9%; 51-75%, 17.7%; 76% or more, 20.1%.

Junior Achievement, 2006

A 2006 survey of teens 13-18+, commissioned by Junior Achievement, found that 39.0% of teens receive a weekly allowance. By amount: Less than $10, 33.6%; $11-$20, 35.3%; $21-$30, 15.6%; $31-$40, 6.0%; more than $40, 9.5%. 

Junior Achievement, 2006

A 2006 survey by the Consumer Electronics Association calculated that the average amount of money teens allocated to consumer electronics purchases during the previous year was $667.

Consumer Electronics Association, 2006

What They Buy Source

Based on a study of vehicles purchased for teen drivers, conducted by CNW Market Research, 91% of male and 93% of female teens received their first-choice vehicle. By 2010, those numbers had dropped to 76% and 55%, respectively. According to CNW, the data clearly shows a distinct move to putting teens into less expensive vehicles. 

Auto Loan Daily, 2010

According to a 2008 study by MultiMedia Intelligence, more than 16 million teens ages 12-17 subscribe to wireless service, up 12% from 2006. And average revenue per user among teens has been growing faster than the overall mobile market. However, the total number of teen subscribers is only expected to grow to 17 million by 2012.

Online Media Daily, 2008

According to a 2008 survey by TRU, the 10 cars most wanted by teens: 1. Ford Mustang; 2. Honda Civic; 3. Honda Accord; 4. Volkswagen New Beetle; 5. Toyota Camry; 6. Toyota Corolla; 7. (tie) Ford Focus and Chevrolet Impala; 9. (tie) Jeep Wrangler and Ford F-150.

Forbes, 2008

A 2008 survey by OTXresearch & the Intelligence Group found that teens (ages 13-17) spend an average of $27 a month on health and beauty products. Deodorants/antiperspirants, whitening toothpastes, lip balms, perfumes and facial scrubs were among the most commonly used products on a daily basis.

The Center for Media Research, 2008

A 2008 survey by OTX and The Intelligence Group showed that clothes and music are the two most popular online purchases for teens, followed by books, electronics and DVDs.

The Center for Media Research, 2008

According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, there were 205,119 surgical and non-surgical procedures performed on patients 18 and younger in 2007, a 15.2% increase over the previous year. The most popular procedures were laser hair removal, microdermabrasion, chemical peel, cosmetic ear surgery and nose reshaping.
 

American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 2008

According to a 2007 Piper Jaffray survey, the top teen-purchased clothing brands, by region: East Coast -- Hollister, 13%; Nordstrom, 11%; (tie) American Eagle and West Coast Brands, 8%. Midwest -- Hollister, 20%; American, Eagle, 15%; Abercrombie & Fitch, 10%. West Coast -- West Coast Brands, 25%; Hollister, 18%; Abercrombie & Fitch, 7%.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

According to a 2007 study by Viacom's The N Channel, 46% of teens said they tend to stick with a few of the brands they really like. However, 52% felt that brands "are created by marketers just to get more money." The teens said that brand names are most important in relation to computers (64%), shoes (56%), MP3 players (55%) cellphone service (54%) and clothes (53%).

Brandweek, 2007

According to a survey of teens ages 13-18, done by The Harrison Group, the percentage of teens who said they "liked" or "loved" the following brands in 2006 (with 2003 percentages in parentheses): Target, 76% (60%); Wal-Mart, 69% (70%); Levi's, 62% (57%); Tommy Hilfiger, 46% (42%); Nautica, 32% (24%); Gucci, 30% (21%); Armani, 27% (15%); Tiffany's, 20% (17%).

The Wall Street Journal, 2007

A 2007 study by Burson-Marsteller identified retail categories in which young people (ages 10-18) have the most influence in their family's purchase decisions: Fast food, 94%; snacks at home, 93%; breakfast cereals, 93%; athletic shoes, 90%; clothing, 87%; soft drinks, 86%; casual chain restaurants, 84%; toothpaste, 73%; shampoo and hair products, 71%; consumer electronics, 53%; cellphones, 46%; computers, 40%; automobiles, 27%; Internet service providers, 27%. 

eMarketer, 2007

Based on a survey by Decision Analyst, the most popular brands of shoes among teens ages 13-17: 1. Nike; 2. Vans; 3. Air Jordan; 4. Adidas; 5. Timberland.

Decision Analyst, Inc., 2007

According to research by the Harrison Group, the top spending categories for teens (ages 13-18) are: 1) Clothes; 2) Eating out; 3) Cars; 4) Movies; 5) Cellphones.

USA Today, 2007

A 2007 survey by BizRate Research identified the five most popular items that teen girls buy with their own money: Apparel and accessories, 67%; music, 60%; books, 45%; DVDs/videos, 43%; health & beauty aids, 43%. The five most popular items purchased by teen boys: Video games, 58%; music, 50%; DVDs/videos, 39%; apparel and accessories, 35%; computer software, 32%.

BizRate.com, 2007

Based on a survey of teens between the ages of 13-18, conducted by The Harrison Group, the percentage of respondents who said they liked to wear the following types of apparel in 2006 (with 2003 percentages in parentheses): Trendy, 46% (36%); designer, 31% (24%); branded, 37%; (31%); non-branded, 19% (20%); natural fibers, 13% (16%); baggy, 28% (33%).

The Wall Street Journal, 2007

According to a 2007 survey by Harris Interactive, 41% of teens identified the computer as the most important consumer electronic device they used on a regular basis.

Harris Interactive, 2007

Based on a 2007 survey of teens ages 14-19, gift cards account for 43% of the presents given by teens, a 12% increase from 2006. Forty-five percent of teens say they have purchased a gift card at a gift card mall (a collection of various retailers' gift cards typically found in convenience or grocery stores), and 21% say they prefer to buy them there.

CardTrak.com, 2007

Based on a survey conducted by State Farm Insurance and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, types of vehicles driven most often by teens: Car, 62%; SUV, 16%; truck, 15%; motorcycle, 6%; minivan, 1%.

Research Alert, 2007

Designer labels account for approximately 15.3% of clothing purchases by 13-17-year-olds, up from 9.6% five years ago, according to The NPD Group.

The NPD Group, 2007

Research by Arbitron found that 81% of teens have been to a movie theater within the previous month, while 59% of teens have seen three or more movies in the past 90 days.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

According to a 2007 study by the National Retail Federation, 43.1% of teens expected to spend at least some of their own money on back-to-school shopping.

National Retail Federation, 2007

Based on a 2007 survey by Viacom's The N Channel, exploring teens' relationship with brands, Apple's iPod emerged as the brand that is "absolutely essential to teens." Other brands scoring well among teen consumers include American Eagle Outfitters, Axe, Baby Phat, Facebook, Google, Hollister Co., MTV, MySpace, Vans and YouTube.

Brandweek, 2007

According to a 2007 survey by JWT Worldwide, 75% of teens (ages 13-19) say they would purchase more environmentally-responsible products and brands if they were more widely available.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

A Spring 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray & Co. determined that 79% of teens own at least one video game platform, while 58% said they were occasional game players (playing at least monthly). Fifty-four percent of teen households indicated they currently own or intend to purchase a next-generation console.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

Based on a 2007 study by Forrester Research, purchase categories that parents say teens have influence over: Groceries, 55%; apparel, 48%; entertainment, 46%; electronics, 22%; cars, 6%.

Forrester Research, 2007

Food ads account for 22% of all TV commercials viewed by teens ages 13-17, according to research by the Kaiser Family Foundation. 

Kaiser Family Foundation, 2007

A Spring 2007 Piper Jaffray survey found that teen spending on skin care and cosmetics was up 12% from the previous year. MAC was the preferred cosmetic brand among teens for the third straight year.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

Based on research by Nielsen Entertainment, cellphone features that teens ages 13-17 have paid extra to obtain (multiple answers): Text messaging, 69%; GPS, 54%; wireless Internet, 49%; wallpaper, 26%; Bluetooth, 12%; picture, 6%; video, 4%.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

According to Nielsen Entertainment, use of video content on cellphones by teens (ages 13-17): Personal videos, 16%; music videos, 11%; movie trailers, 10%; non-live TV, 6%; full TV shows, 5%; full movies, 5%; mobile commercials, 5%; live TV, 4%.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

A 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray determined that Victoria's Secret was the all-around favorite fragrance among teen girls.

Marketing Daily, 2007

According to a 2007 survey by Capital One, 40% of teens expect their first car to cost more than $10,000.

Capital One Financial, 2007

According to a 2007 study by Piper Jaffray, of the 42% of teens who say they will buy an MP3 player in the next 12 months, 73% expect to purchase an iPod. Sixty-seven percent of teens are willing to pay between $100-$300 for an MP3 player.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

A 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray found that of those teens who own an MP3 player, 82% also own some form of iPod.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

Servings of both coffee and iced tea at commercial food service outlets have increased by 12% since 2001, with fast-food establishments leading the way. Demographically, growth has been strongest among under-18 consumers, with double-digit increases among teens.

Marketing Daily, 2007

According to a survey by AutoExtra.com, three out of four parents buy their children cars, and 82% of those cars are used.

Dallas Morning News, 2006

Based on a survey done by Opinion Research Corporation, what types of stores teens would most like to receive gift cards from: Clothing store, 30%; electronics store, 19%; music store, 16%; hobby or sports store, 15%; discount store, 9%; bookstore, 7%.

 

Opinion Research Corp., 2006

Where They Buy Source

The top teen specialty apparel retailers, based on 2007 sales (totals in millions), with change from 2006 in parentheses: 1. Abercrombie & Fitch, $3,749.9 (+13.0%); 2. American Eagle Outfitters, $3,055.2 (+9.0%); 3. Express, $1,820.0 (n/a); 4. Aeropostale, $1,590.9 (+17.3%); 5. Urban Outfitters, $1,507.7 (+23.0%); 6. Pacific Sunwear of California, $1,454.2 (+0.8%); 7. Forever 21, $1,110.0 (n/a); 8. Charlotte Russe, $740.9 (+8.7%); 9. The Buckle, $620.0 (+16.9%); 10. The Wet Seal, $611.2 (+8.3%); 11. Hot Topic, $590.5 (-6.2%); 12. Zumiez, $381.0 (+27.9%); 13. Deb Shops, $319.5 (n/a); 14. Delia's, $274.0 (+6.5%); 15. Torrid, $137.6 (+12.6%).

STORES, 2008

According to a 2008 Junior Achievement survey, the top summer job categories for male teens are retail/sales (22%), restaurant/fast food (17%), lawn care/landscaping (11%), office internship (7%), construction (7%) and life guard/recreation (7%). The most popular summer jobs for female teens are babysitting/daycare (23%), retail/sales (20%), restaurant/fast food (20%), office work/clerical (6%), volunteer (6%) and internship (6%).

Junior Achievement, 2008

Based on a 2007 survey of teens ages 12-19, conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, percentage of the female respondents who had shopped the following stores for clothing in the previous year: 1. Wal-Mart, 81%; 2. Target, 69%; 3. J.C. Penney, 62%; 4. Victoria's Secret, 50%; 5. Old Navy, 49%; 6. Kohl's, 43%; 7. Aropostale, 41%; 8. (tie) American Eagle Outfitters and Macy's, 40%; 10. Sears, 38%.

Teenage Research Unlimited, 2007

A 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray found that teens' three favorite restaurants were Starbucks, Olive Garden and Applebee's.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

According to the Spring 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray, Hollister was the teens' favorite store to shop for apparel, followed by American Eagle Outfitters, West Coast Brands (which includes Pacific Sunwear of California, Volcom, Hurley, Quiksilver, Billabong, Sun Diego, Roxy and Element), Abercrombie & Fitch, and Forever 21.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

A 2007 survey conducted by Decision Analyst and the Hypothesis Group asked teens ages 13-17 to name their favorite restaurant chains: 1. Subway; 2. McDonald's; 3. Taco Bell; 4. Olive Garden; 5. Pizza Hut.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

A 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray showed that teenage girls prefer to purchase skin care and cosmetics products through discount channels.

Marketing Daily, 2007

More than two-thirds of teens go to a shopping mall at least once a week, both to shop and socialize.

, 2007

Based on a 2007 survey by eCrush, where teens (ages 13-17) go on dates (multiple answers): Movie theater, 87%; mall, 64%; restaurant, 58%; school dance, 53%; drive/walk around, 53%; park, 51%; school event (sports, play, etc.), 49%; concert/live music, 34%; coffee shop, 22%; professional sporting event, 14%; town recreation center, 12%.

Research Alert, 2007

Based on a study by BizRate Research, of the 58% of teens who shop online, 24% make more than one purchase a month.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

According to a 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray, where teens purchase music: Retail store, 30%; online retailer with physical distribution, 7%; download, 63%. 

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

A Spring 2007 survey of some 1,800 teens found that among those young people who own an MP3 player, 82% have some form of iPod. For online music services, 89% of the teenage survey participants indicated they used iTunes.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

The Spring 2007 survey conducted by Piper Jaffray & Co. found that teens' favorite stores for their home/room furnishings were IKEA and Pottery Barn/PB Teen.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

Sixty percent of teens eat at a mall food court at least once a month; the average is three visits per month.

Belden Associates, 2006

An online study by Consumer Technographics found that 71% of teen females had bought something during their last visit to a shopping mall, as did 57% of teenage males.

Forrester Research, 2006

Business Trends Source

Based on research by the International Council of Shopping Centers, same-store sales at retailers targeting teen consumers were down 0.5% in 2008, compared to increases of 3.3% in 2006 and 12.1% in 2005.

Retail Wire, 2008

Overall spending on products bought by and for teens (ages 12-17) climbed to $189.7 billion in 2006, and is projected to reach $208.7 billion by 2011. According to a study by Packaged Facts, actual spending by teens themselves totaled $79.7 billion in 2006, with spending by parents and other family on teens amounting to $110.0 billion.

Packaged Facts, 2007

According to a Spring 2007 survey by Piper Jaffray & Co., total spending on fashion products (apparel, shoes and accessories) by teens was down 5%, when matched against a prior survey conducted in Spring 2006. However, spending on fashion merchandise still accounted for 44% of teens' total budget.

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

A Spring 2007 survey conducted by Piper Jaffray & Co. revealed that total spending on fashion products (apparel, shoes and accessories) for teens by parents rose 7% when compared to a similar survey done in the Spring of 2006.
 

Piper Jaffray & Co., 2007

According to a 2007 study by eMarketer, of the 9.4 million teens (ages 14-17) who use the Internet, 7.3 million routinely watch TV at the same time, 6.9 million listen to Radio, 4.5 million read magazines and 2.9 million read the newspaper.

eMarketer, 2007

A 2007 Bridge Ratings study calculated that teens ages 13-17 spent an average of 12 hours and 10 minutes per day with all categories of media during May 2007, up from 9 hours and 30 minutes in May 2004. 

eMarketer, 2007

A 2007 Harris Interactive survey found that 62% of teens (ages 13-18) say they really enjoy going shopping.

Harris Interactive, 2007

Forty-eight percent of U.S. high school students participate in some type of traditional sport, such as football, basketball, baseball, softball, track, volleyball, soccer, tennis, golf, swimming, wrestling and gymnastics.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

A total of 37.6% of teens ages 16-19 were enrolled in school during July 2006, up from 36.5% a year earlier and more than three times the share enrolled two decades ago, according to the U.S. Labor Department.

USA Today, 2007

A 2007 study by EPM Communications determined that more than half of teens have created some sort of online content, including blogs, Web pages, online artwork or remixes of other online content.

Research Alert, 2007

Based on a 2006 survey of teens ages 13-18+, commissioned by Junior Achievement, 72.1% of teens report that they influence household buying decisions, with 13-14-year-olds (76.1%) being the most likely to say they influence these decisons.

Junior Achievement, 2006

Misc Source

According to a 2008 study by Junior Achievement, where teens expect to learn the skills they need for their future careers: High school and college classes, 47%; on-the-job training, 24%; parents or family members, 11%; volunteer opportunities, 7%; after-school clubs or programs, 6%; some other place, 5%. 

Research Alert, 2008

Based on a survey by Harris Interactive, 54% of girls and 46% of boys ages 13-15 used social networking Web sites in 2007.

eMarketer, 2008

A survey of teenagers in grades 9-11, conducted by State Farm Insurance and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, determined that 59% of teens drive three or more hours per week.

Research Alert, 2007

According to research by BIGresearch statistics, among teen (ages 14-17) Internet users, 7.3 million of the 9.4 million online in 2006 watched TV while online, and 6.9 million listened to the Radio. The report concluded that although multitasking extends across all age groups, teens are generally more likely to multitask media than adults.

eMarketer, 2007

Based on a study by Harris Interactive and Alloy Media & Marketing, on average, teens have 75 friends connected to their online profile, 52 on their instant messaging buddy list, 39 on their e-mail contact list, and 38 on their cellphone.

Research Alert, 2007

Forty-two percent of teens (43% of boys and 40% of girls) ages 12-17 stream audio or video content on their computers at least once a week. Teen "streamies" spend 28% more time online than regular teens do, according to a study by Knowledge Networks.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

More than a quarter (26%) of teens' leisure time is spent with multiple forms of media.

, 2007

Sixty percent of teens ages 13-17 watch video content on a device other than their home TV, compared with 40% of adult consumers. Types of content teens are watching on non-TV devices: Movies, 66%; music videos, 55%; online videos, 51%; TV shows, 50%.-

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

Based on a 2007 survey by Junior Achievement, reasons why teens work summertime jobs are to earn extra spending money (29.5%), save money for college (28.9%), gain work experience (23.9%), pay for a car (9.5%) and help support their family (8.2%).

Junior Achievement, 2007

Based on research by Alloy Media & Marketing, 96% of online teens and tweens connect to a social network at least once a week.

Advertising Age, 2007

According to the Pew Internet & American Life project, 57% of teens with families earning less than $75,000 a year say they use social networking sites to make new friends, compared with 37% of teens living in households earning more than $75,000.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

According to a study by Weekly Reader Research, although 92% of kids ages 6-18 have never been to a NASCAR race, once they have been, 84% say they want to go again.

Youth Markets Alert, 2007

During the school year, 43.0% of teens work at a job, with females being slightly more likely than males to hold jobs.

Junior Achievement, 2006

A 2006 survey conducted by the Charles Schwab Foundation found that 31% of teens (ages 13-18) owe money, either to a person or a company.

Charles Schwab Foundation, 2006