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Who Buys Source

Profiling adults 18+ who utilized the services of a travel agent on their last trip (either domestic or foreign):
 

GfK MRI, 2010

Of those adults 18+ who used the services of a travel agent on their last trip (either foreign or domestic), 53.4% were women and 46.6% were men.
 

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who used the services of a travel agent on their last trip (either foreign or domestic), by age group: 18-24, 7.7%; 25-34, 13.5%; 35-44, 18.09%; 45-54, 23.1%; 55-64, 18.9%; 65+, 18.8%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who worked with a travel agent on their last trip (either foreign or domestic), by income level: $100,000+, 40.8%; $75-99,999, 19.1%; $60-74,999, 12.0%; $50-59,999, 7.5%; $40-49,999, 6.1%; $30-39,999, 5.1%; $20-29,999, 5.2%; under $20,000, 4.2%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who utilized the services of a travel agent on their last trip (either domestic or foreign), by race: White, 78.8%; Black, 7.9%; Other, 13.3%; Hispanic origin, 9.3%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who used a travel agent on their last trip (either foreign or domestic), by region: Northeast, 22.3%; Midwest, 23.3%; South, 31.4%; West, 23.0%.

GfK MRI, 2010

Adults 18+ who worked with a travel agent on their last trip (either domestic or foreign), by marital status: Single, 17.1%; married, 66.9%; separated/widowed/divorced, 16.0%.

GfK MRI, 2010

According to a survey by The Leisure Travel Monitor, of those travelers who used the services of a traditional travel agent in 2009, 62% said the agent was influential in their choice of air carrriers and accommodations, up from 46% in 2001. 

Travel Weekly, 2009

A 2009 study by The Leisure Travel Monitor concluded that Baby Boomers (ages 44-62) and Matures (ages 63+) each account for 40% of agency leisure travel customers, while Gen Xers (ages 30-43) make up 16% of the agents' leisure customer base and Echo Boomers (ages 18-29) account for just 5%.

Travel Weekly, 2009

According to a 2009 study by The Leisure Travel Monitor, consumers with household incomes of $50,000-$100,000 account for 47% of travel agency leisure customers.

Travel Weekly, 2009

A 2009 survey by The Leisure Travel Monitor found that married couples make up 68% of a travel agency's leisure clients, while individuals who are divorced, widowed or separated account for 20% of agency leisure business, and never-married singles are responsible for 11% of the typical agency's customers.

Travel Weekly, 2009

Based on 2009 research by The Leisure Travel Monitor, among air travelers who booked a hotel stay for at least one leisure trip in the previous year, 28% utilized the services of a conventional travel agency for at least a portion of their travels.

Travel Weekly, 2009

According to a 2009 study by PhoCusWright, of those consumers who book tour packages through travel agents, Baby Boomers account for an estimated 40% of the total, compared to 36% for Seniors and 24% for younger travelers.

Travel Weekly, 2009

According to Mediamark Research, metro areas whose residents index highest for international travel: 1. San Francisco/Oakland/San Jose; 2. Washington, DC (Hagerstown, MD); 3. New York; 4. Boston (Manchester, NH); 5. Los Angeles; 6. Chicago; 7. Monterey/Salinas, CA; 8. San Diego; 9. Santa Barbara/Santa Maria/San Luis Obispo, CA; 10. Philadelphia.

Marketing Daily, 2008

When They Buy Source

According to a mid-2009 survey of Altour travel agents, 68% of bookings were made in the 30-90-day range.

Travel Weekly, 2009

Why They Buy Source

According to a 2009 survey by the Yankelovich Leisure Travel Monitor, primary reasons that travelers utilize the services of a traditional travel agent (more than one answer possible): Agent's expertise/product knowledge, 62%; convenience, 51%; price, 39%; uncomfortable booking on one's own, 30%; recommendation of a friend, 28%; other, 20%.

Travel Weekly, 2009

According to a survey by The Leisure Travel Monitor, among consumers who used a traditional travel agent in 2009, percentage who said their agent influenced their choices in the following categories: Hotel or resort, 66%; airline, 63%; vacation package or tours, 61%; travel insurance, 51%; cruise line, 47%; destination, 44%; car rental company, 35%; rail, 22%. 

Travel Weekly, 2009

How They Buy Source

As of August 2009, e-tickets accounted for more than 99% of travel agents' airline ticket volume, compared to less than 48% at the end of 1999.

Airlines Reporting Corporation, 2009

Credit card transactions accounted for 88.3% of airline ticket sales made by travel agents in 2008, up from 83.3% in 2004.

Airlines Reporting Corporation, 2009

A survey by the American Society of Travel Agents determined how agencies conducted business with their clients in 2008: By phone, 59.2% (down from 71.6% in 2003); Internet (Website or e-mail), 22.8% (up from 8.9% in 2003); walk-ins/face-to-face appointments, 18.0% (down from 19.6% in 2003).

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

According to a 2009 survey done by the American Society of Travel Agents, among those agencies that offer online booking tools, an average of 9.1% of their business is directly booked through their Web site.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

What They Buy Source

Overall, travel agents reported their sales mix as 50.2% domestic and 49.8% international in 2008, reflecting a noticeable shift toward international business over the past few years (in 2004, the ratio was 60.0% percent domestic and 40.0% international). Leisure bookings accounted for 76.1% of travel agents' dollar volume in 2008, compared to 23.9% for business travel.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

Based on research by the American Society of Travel Agents, share of agency sales in 2008, by category: Tour packages, 36.9%; airline, 24.4%; cruise, 19.8%; hotel, 12.8%; car rental, 3.2%; other. 2.8%.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

The packaged travel industry consists of three general categories: Package Tour Operators (representing 68% of the market); Escorted Tour Operators (with 24% of the market); and Group Specialists (with 8% of the market). Travel agents tend to work with larger tour operators who sell packages, and escorted programs.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

According to a survey of travel agents, during the second quarter of 2009 the three top-selling cruise destinations were the Caribbean, Alaska and tie between Europe, Mexico, Hawaii and the Mediterranean.

Travel Weekly, 2009

According to a 2009 survey by The Leisure Travel Monitor, the most popular types of travel booked via the Web (more than one answer possible): Trip to visit family or friends, 54%; cruise, 37%; resort vacation, 35%; special event (wedding, reunion, etc.), 30%; bundled travel package (combining air, car, hotel, etc.), 27%; escorted package tour, 16%.

Travel Weekly, 2009

According to a 2008 study by PhoCusWright, when it comes to booking travel, travel agents sell 85% of all cruises, 70% of all tours and packages, 50% of all airline tickets, 30% of all hotel rooms, and 25% of all car rentals.

PhoCusWright, 2008

Where They Buy Source

The 10 largest American travel agencies, based on 2008 revenue (totals in billions): 1. American Express, $29.1; 2. Carlson Wagonlit Travel, $27.8; 3. Expedia, $21.3; 4. Hogg Robinson Group, $16.0; 5. BCD Travel, $14.0; 6. Orbitz Worldwide, $10.8; 7. Travelocity, $10.6; 8. Priceline, $7.4; 9. AAA Travel, $3.9; 10. Travel Leaders Group, $1.9.

Travel Weekly, 2009

According to a survey of travel agents conducted by the American Society of Travel Agents in 2009, the most popular domestic travel destinations: 1. Orlando; 2. Las Vegas; 3. New York City; 4. Honolulu; 5. San Francisco; 6. Los Angeles; 7. Miami; 8. San Diego; 9. Seattle; 10. Washington, DC.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

According to a survey of travel agents taken by the American Society of Travel Agents during 2009, the top international travel destinations: 1. London; 2. Rome; 3. Cancun; 4. Paris; 5. Jamaica; 6. Punta Cana; 7. Florence; 8. Puerto Vallarta; 9. Venice; 10. Frankfurt.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

Where travel agencies were located in 2008: Main street, 28.9%; home-based, 27.7%; office complex, 22.2%; strip mall, 15.3%; high-rise office building, 2.7%; Internet-only, 1.0%; other (primarily stand-alone office building), 2.2%.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

Business Trends Source

As of August 2009, there were 16,434 full-service travel agencies (including single-office agencies, main offices and full-service branches) in the U.S., down from 20,033 at the end of 2005. There were also 1,037 satellite ticket delivery locations in August of 2009, down from 2,010 at the end of 2005.

Airlines Reporting Corporation, 2009

According to a survey by the American Society of Travel Agents, only 39.1% of travel agencies realized a profit in 2008, down from 52.7% in 2007. The survey also showed that 18.9% of travel agencies broke even in 2008 (compared to 20.2% in 2007), while 32.7% operated at a loss in 2008 (compared to 16.3% in 2007). A total of 9.3% of the survey respondents either didn't know or were unsure of their financial situation in 2008.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

Travel agents generated airline ticket sales of $79.566 billion in 2008, compared to $79.885 billion in 2007 and $77.880 billion in 2006.

Airlines Reporting Corporation, 2009

According to research by the American Society of Travel Agents, share of travel agency earnings in 2008, by amount: Less than $1 million, 35.5%; $1 million-$1.9 million, 25.0%; $2 million -$2.9 million, 12.4%; $3 million-$3.9 million, 5.4%; $4 million-$4.9 million, 4.3%; $5 million-$10 million, 8.1%; more than $10 million, 9.3%.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

According to a 2009 study by PhoCusWright, the U.S. package tour market totaled $12.3 billion in 2008, with travel agents booking 69% of the business (the remainder being booked directly by consumers). The package tour market is expected to suffer a 17% decline in 2009 to $10.2 billion, before rebounding in 2010 to $10.4 billion.

Travel Weekly, 2009

Most travel agencies are small businesses, with 83% of them employing five or fewer full-time employees.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

According to a survey by the American Society of Travel Agents, revenue attributed to air sales was expected to decrease 30% from 2002 through the end of 2009, while tour packages and cruise segments have both increased their share of agency revenue significantly since 2002.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

Based on research by the American Society of Travel Agents, the average salary for a travel agent in 2008 was $30,458, with an average length of employment of 10.2 years. The average annual sales per agent in 2008 was $832,022.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

Since 1998, the number of travel agencies charging service fees has increased from 64% to more than 93% today. Typically, agencies charge fees for all airline-related services, but some charge fees for other services such as trip research, Amtrack, car rentals and hotel-only reservations.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

A 2009 survey by the American Society of Travel Agents revealed that agencies who consider themselves to be equally leisure- and corporate-oriented outspend the other two business models in advertising.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

A 2009 survey by the American Society of Travel Agents indicated that 49% of agencies who charge service fees expected to make changes in their fee structure during the year.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

Eighty-four percent of travel agencies belong to a consortia and/or franchise, with Vacation.com ranking as the most popular.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

Misc Source

The average travel agency has been in business 24 years.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009

A 2009 survey conducted by the American Society of Travel Agents found that 20% of new travel agency customers book once and never return.

American Society of Travel Agents, 2009