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Who Buys Source

Profiling adults 18+ who bought from 7-10 books in the past year, and those consumers who specifically purchased books from a bookstore in the previous 12 months:

GfK MRI, 2011

Of those adults 18+ who bought from 7-10 books in the past year, 64.3% were women and 35.7% were men.

GfK MRI, 2011

Of those adults 18+ who bought any books at a bookstore in the past year, 59.2% were women and 40.8% were men.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought from 7-10 books in the past year, by age group: 18-24, 11.8%; 25-34, 20.1%; 35-44, 20.0%; 45-54, 18.2%; 55-64, 15.8%; 65+, 14.1%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought any books at a bookstore in the past year, by age bracket: 18-24, 11.9%; 25-34, 18.5%; 35-44, 19.3%; 45-54, 20.8%; 55-64, 15.7%; 65+, 13.8%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought from 7-10 books in the past year, by income group: $100,000+, 33.2%; $75-99,999, 16.6%; $60-74,999, 12.3%; $50-59,999, 7.7%; $40-49,999, 8.1%; $30-39,999, 7.3%; $20-29,999, 6.7%; under $20,000, 8.1%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought any books at a bookstore in the past year, by income bracket: $100,000+, 35.4%; $75-99,999, 16.5%; $60-74,999, 11.5%; $50-59,999, 7.8%; $40-49,999, 7.7%; $30-39,999, 7.9%; $20-29,999, 5.9%; under $20,000, 7.3%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought from 7-10 books in the past year, by region: Northeast, 18.8%; Midwest, 22.4%; South, 35.6%; West, 23.2%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought any books at a bookstore in the past year, by region: Northeast, 20.7%; Midwest, 20.9%; South, 34.2; West, 24.2%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought from 7-10 books in the past year, by race: White, 80.1%; Black, 8.8%; Other, 11.1%; Hispanic origin, 10.0%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought any books at a bookstore in the past year, by race: White, 80.0%; Black, 8.5%; Other, 11.5%; Hispanic origin, 10.9%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought from 7-10 books in the past year, by marital status: Single, 23.8%; married, 60.2%; separated/widowed/divorced, 16.0%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who bought any books at a bookstore in the past year, by marital status: Single, 25.5%; married, 58.7%; separated/widowed/divorced, 15.8%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Based on a 2011 survey by the Book Industry Study Group, today's e-book power reader (someone who buys an e-book at least once a week) is a 44-year-old woman who loves romance and is spending more on buying books now than in the past. She uses a dedicated e-reader like a Kindle instead of reading on her computer.

Book Industry Study Group, 2011

A 2011 Nielsen survey found that women accounted for 61% of e-reader owners, up from 46% in 2010.

The Nielsen Company, 2011

According to a survey of book buyers, conducted by Bowker, 57% of the respondents reported reading a book at least once a week in 2010, down from 59% in 2009.

Bowker, 2011

Based on a second-quarter 2011 Nielsen study, share of e-reader owners, by age bracket: 13-17, 7%; 18-24, 10%; 25-34, 18%; 35-44, 14%; 45-54, 21%; 55+, 30%.

The Nielsen Company, 2011

When They Buy Source

Monthly share of book store sales (3-year average, 2008-2010): January, 13.8%; February, 6.4%; March, 6.1%; April, 5.8%; May, 6.7%; June, 6.5%; July, 6.6%; August, 14.3%; September, 9.2%; October, 6.1%; November, 6.3%; December, 12.2%.

U.S. Department of Commerce, 2011

Why They Buy Source

A 2011 survey by the Book Industry Study Group found that the most influential factors leading to an e-book purchase are free samples and low prices.

Book Industry Study Group, 2011


What They Buy Source

Estimated 2010 net sales of various book segments (totals in millions), with percentage change from 2009 in parentheses: Adult hardcover, $1,570 (-5.1%); Adult paperback, $1,380 (-2.0%); Children's hardcover, $694 (-5.5%); Children's/Young Adults paperback, $547 (-5.7%); Mass market paperback, $674 (-6.3%); Religious, $585 (-0.5%); Professional, $813 (+5.0%); K-12 Education, $3,590 (+3.2%); Higher education, $4,580 (+7.8%); audiobooks, $219 (+6.7%); E-books, $441 (+164.4%). 

Association of American Publishers, 2011

As of September 2011, eight of the top 20 titles on USA Today's weekly best-selling books list were e-books.

USA Today, 2011

Most e-books sold are fiction, with literary fiction, science fiction, and romance each comprising over 20% of all format purchases.  

Book Industry Study Group, 2011

Where They Buy Source

Random House is the world's largest trade book publisher. A division of German media conglomerate Bertelsmann, Random House publishes under such names as Ballantine, Bantam, Dell, Doubleday and Alfred A. Knopf. 

Hoover's, 2011

Barnes & Noble is the No. 1 bookseller in the country. The company operates about 1,340 bookstores, including some 705 Barnes & Noble superstores in 50 states and the District of Columbia. The company's online sales venue, barnesandnoble.com, now accounts for approximately 12% of its total revenues. Sales for Barnes & Noble amounted to $6.999 billion in 2011, up 20.5% from the previous year.

Hoover's, 2011

The No. 3 U.S. bookseller (behind Barnes & Noble and Amazon) is Books-A-Million, which had 2011 sales of $495 million (down 2.7% from 2010). The company operates around 230 stores (under the Books-A-Million, Books & Co. and 2nd & Charles names), most of them superstores, plus some 20 smaller-sized Bookland and Books-A-Million locations.

Hoover's, 2011

Half-Price Books operates more than 110 stores in 15 states, selling used and new books, magazines, videos and recorded music. Approximately half of the merchandise they sell is new.
 

Hoover's, 2011

Based on Bowker PubTrack Consumer survey data, the share of book dollar sales in 2010 attribued to the following retail channels:  Online retailers, 30%; bookstore chains, 29%; book clubs, 6%; non-traditional bookstores, 6%; mass merchandisers, 5%; independent bookstores, 5%.

USA Today, 2011

A late-2011 survey of e-book readers, by the Book Industry Study Group, showed that Amazon.com was the preferred source for e-book acquisition (70%), followed by Barnes & Noble (26%). 

Book Industry Study Group, 2011

According to a 2011 Gfk MRI survey, U.S. metro areas with the most avid book readers: 1. Minneapolis-St. Paul; 2. Salt Lake City; 3. Tucson; 4. Las Vegas; 5. Portland; 6. Seattle-Tacoma; 7. Colorado Springs-Pueblo; 8. Spokane; 9. Denver; 10. Washington, DC.

Marketing Daily, 2011

According to an annual study by Central Connecticut State University, the most literate major cities in America in 2010: 1. Washington, DC; 2. Seattle; 3. Minneapolis; 4. Atlanta; 5. Pittsburgh; 6. San Francisco; 7. St. Paul; 8. Denver; 9. (tie) Portland and St. Louis. The rankings were based on six key indicators of literacy: Newspaper circulation; number of bookstores; library resources; periodical publishing resources; educational attainment; and Internet resources.

USA Today, 2011

Business Trends Source

Sales of traditional book stores declined 2.4% in 2010 to $15.662 billion, down from $16.051 billion in 2009. Sales in 2008 totaled $16.870 billion. 

U.S. Department of Commerce, 2011

The number of new book titles and editions published in the U.S. increased 4.7% in 2010 to 316,480, up from 302,410 in 2009. The top five categories for U.S. book production in 2010 were (with change from 2009 in parentheses): 1. Fiction, 47,392 new titles (-2.8%); 2. Juveniles, 32,638 new titles (-1.2%); 3. Sociology/Economics, 28,991 new titles (+7.8%); 4. Science, 21,414 new titles (+37.2%); 5. Religion, 19,793 new titles (-3.6%).

Bowker, 2011

A 2011 Bowker PubTrack Consumer survey determined that women dominate book purchasing across all genres, Baby Boomers are the top buying generation, and fiction continues to form the backbone of industry sales.

Bowker, 2011

According to a late-2010 Bowker PubTrack Consumer survey, 51% of book buyers said the economy had no impact on their book-purchasing habits -- the highest percentage in two years.

Bowker, 2011

More than 20% of Random House's revenue in the first half of 2011 came from digital sales.

USA Today, 2011

The number of "non-traditional" books  published in 2010 jumped 169% to 2,776,260 titles. These books, marketed almost exclusively on the Internet, are largely on-demand titles produced by reprint houses specializing in public domain works and by presses catering to self-publishers and "micro-niche" publications.

Bowker, 2011

A mid-2011 survey by Harris Interactive determined that 15% of U.S. adults use an e-reader device, such as a Kindle, iPad or Nook, to read books (up from 8% in 2010). 

Harris Interactive, 2011