Back
RAB Mobile
Who Buys Source

According to an August 2012 American Pulse survey of approximately 3,300 U.S. adults, conducted by Prosper Business Development, how the male respondents identified themselves politically: Extremely Conservative, 16.0%; Moderately Conservative, 33.5%; In the Middle, 30.5%; Moderately Liberal, 13.5%; Extremely Liberal, 6.5%.

Prosper Business Development, 2012

According to an August 2012 American Pulse survey of approximately 3,300 U.S. adults, conducted by Prosper Business Development, how the female respondents identified themselves politically: Extremely Conservative, 11.7%; Moderately Conservative, 26.2%; In the Middle, 35.6%; Moderately Liberal, 20.0%; Extremely Liberal, 6.4%.

Prosper Business Development, 2012

Profiling adults 18+ who voted in any local, state or federal election in the past year:

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who voted in any local, state or federal election in the previous year, by age group: 18-24, 6.9%; 25-34, 14.0%; 35-44, 17.7%; 45-54, 21.5%; 55-64, 19.2%; 65+, 20.7%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who voted in any local, state or federal election in the past year, by income bracket: $100,000+, 31.9%; $75-99,999, 15.8%; $60-74,999, 11.7%; $50-59,999, 8.2%; $40-49,999, 8.0%; $30-39,999, 8.2%; $20-29,999, 7.4%; under $20,000, 8.8%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who voted in any local, state or federal election in the past year, by race: White, 81.1%; Black, 11.7%; Other, 7.2%; Hispanic origin, 7.4%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who voted in any local, state or federal election in the past year, by region: Northeast, 19.7%; Midwest, 24.0%; South, 34.2%; West, 22.1%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Adults 18+ who voted in any local, state or federal election in the previous year, by marital status: Single, 19.3%; married, 62.2%; separated/widowed/divorced, 18.5%.

GfK MRI, 2011

Of those adults 18+ who voted in any local, state or federal election in the past year, 53.1% were women and 46.9% were men.

GfK MRI, 2011

Percentage of the voting-age citizen population who actually voted in the November 2010 mid-term elections, by age bracket: 18-24, 21.3%; 25-44, 37.1%; 45-64, 54.4%; 65-74, 62.1%; 75+, 59.2%.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

Percentage of the following ethnic groups (citizens) who voted in the November 2010 mid-term elections: White, 48.6%; Black, 43.5%; Hispanic, 31.2%; Asian, 30.8%.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

Percentage of the following income groups who voted in the November 2010 mid-term elections: $20,000-$29,999, 40.4%; $30,000-$39,999, 44.3%; $40,000-$49,999, 49.0%; $50,000-$74,999, 51.9%; $75,000-$99,999, 57.8%; $100,000-$149,999, 61.0%; $150,000+, 61.6%.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

States with the largest numbers of registered voters in the November 2010 mid-term elections (totals in millions): 1. California, 13.864; 2. Texas, 9.493; 3. New York, 8.395; 4. Florida, 7.994; 5. Pennsylvania, 6.031; 6. Illinois, 5.823; 7. Ohio, 5.601; 8. Michigan, 5.127; 9. North Carolina, 4.455; 10. Georgia, 4.076; 11. New Jersey, 3.656; 12. Virginia, 3.546.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

States with the largest totals of registered African-American voters in the November 2010 mid-term elections (totals in millions): New York, 1.306; Georgia, 1.260; Texas, 1.242; Florida, 1.073; California, 0.932; North Carolina, 0.871; Illinois, 0.844; Louisiana, 0.743; Maryland, 0.685; South Carolina, 0.616; Ohio, 0.606; Alabama, 0.599. 

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

States with the largest numbers of registered Hispanic voters in the November 2010 mid-term elections (totals in millions): California, 3.025; Texas, 2.334; Florida, 1.239; New York, 0.830; Arizona, 0.610; Illinois, 0.388; New Jersey, 0.284; New Mexico, 0.249; Colorado, 0.214; Pennsylvania, 0.155; Massachusetts, 0.134; Washington, 0.110.

 

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

States with the largest number of registered Asian voters in the November 2010 mid-term elections: California, 1,472,000; Texas, 262,000; New York, 239,000; Hawaii, 223,000; New Jersey, 175,000; Virginia, 156,000; Washington, 141,000; Illinois, 132,000; Florida, 128,000; Maryland, 71,000; North Carolina, 70,000; Massachusetts, 63,000.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011


Why They Buy Source

Based on an August 2012 American Pulse survey of approximately 3,300 U.S. adults, issues that the respondents said will have the most impact on their vote in the 2012 presidential election: Economy, 71.1%; Healthcare, 61.0%; Taxes, 51.4%; Government Spending/Budget Cuts, 50.8%; Job Creation, 50.2%; Immigration, 38.5%; Social Security, 37.8%; Government Ethics/Corruption, 36.1%; Education, 30.1%; Energy Policy, 30.0%.

Prosper Business Development, 2012

Most frequently-cited reasons for not voting in the November 2010 mid-term elections: Too busy/conflicting schedule, 26.6%; not interested, 16.4%; illness or disability, 11.3%; out of town, 9.2%; did not like candidates or issues, 8.6%; forgot to vote, 8.0%; registration problems, 3.3%; had transportation problems, 2.4%; inconvenient polling place, 2.1%; bad weather conditions, 0.1%; other reason, 9.0%; don't know/refused, 3.1%.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

How They Buy Source

Methods of registration for voters prior to the November 2010 mid-term elections: At department of motor vehicles, 22.9%; county or government registration office, 19.9%; mailed form to election office, 13.5%; at polls on election day, 7.0%; at school, hospital, campus, 5.7%; registration booth, 5.2%; registered using the Internet or online, 1.8%; at public assistance agency, 1.1%; other place/way, 3.4%; don't know or refused, 19.4%.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011


Where They Buy Source

Through mid-September 2012, U.S. House of Representatives races that had generated the most spending for the 2012 elections: 1. Ohio District 8; 2. Minnesota District 6; 3. Florida District 18; 4. Connecticut District 5; 5. California District 30; 6. New Jersey District 9; 7. Texas District 33; 8. Virginia District 7; 9. New York District 27; 10. Maryland District 6.

Center for Responsive Politics, 2012

Through mid-September 2012, U.S. Senate races that had generated the most spending for the 2012 elections: 1. Texas; 2. Massachusetts; 3. Missouri; 4. Connecticut; 5. Wisconsin; 6. Virginia; 7. Ohio; 8. Arizona; 9. Florida; 10. Pennsylvania.

Center for Responsive Politics, 2012

As of mid-September 2012, the top U.S. metro areas for political contributions in the 2012 election cycle: 1. Washington, DC-MD-VA-WV; 2. New York; 3. Los Angeles-Long Beach; 4. Chicago; 5. Boston, MA-NH; 6. Dallas; 7. Houston; 8. San Francisco; 9. Las Vegas, NV-AZ; 10. Philadelphia, PA-NJ.

Center for Responsive Politics, 2012

As of mid-September 2012, the top states for political contributions made during the 2012 election cycle: 1. California; 2. District of Columbia; 3. Texas; 4. New York; 5. Florida; 6. Virginia; 7. Illinois; 8. Massachusetts; 9. Pennsylvania; 10. Nevada.

Center for Responsive Politics, 2012

As of mid-September 2012, the top U.S. zip codes for political contributions made during the 2012 election cycle: 1. 89109 (Las Vegas); 2. 75240 (Dallas); 3. 10022 (New York); 4. 20036 (Washington, DC); 5. 77234 (Houston); 6. 20001 (Washington, DC); 7. 10021 (New York); 8. 10019 (New York); 9. 90067 (Los Angeles); 10. 10028 (New York).

Center for Responsive Politics, 2012

States with the highest percentage of voter turnout for the 2010 mid-term elections, as a percentage of each state's citizen voting age population: Maine, 59.4%; Washington, 58.1%; Oregon, 56.3%; North Dakota, 55.7%; Vermont, 55.0%; Minnesota, 54.9%; South Dakota, 54.9%; Wisconsin, 54.3%; Colorado, 52.6%; Iowa, 52.3%; Massachusetts, 52.2%; Montana, 51.9%; Delaware, 51.0%; South Carolina, 50.9%; Alaska, 50.7%.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

Business Trends Source

Research firm Borrell Associates projects that spending on political ads in 2012 will reach $9.8 billion, compared to just under $7.0 billion in 2008. This figures includes 13,000 statewide, congressional and municipal races, as well as the presidential election. Radio is expected to receive 8.3% of the 2012 spending, or $819.2 million, up from $552.5 million in 2008.

Advertising Age, 2012

As of mid-September 2012; the top political contributors for the 2012 election cycle, by industry: 1. Retired; 2. Securities/Investments; 3. Lawyers/Law Firms; 4. Real Estate; 5. Health Professionals; 6. Candidate Committees; 7. Business Services; 8. TV/Movies/Music; 9. Oil & Gas; 10. Insurance.

Center for Responsive Politics, 2012

In the November 2010 mid-term elections, 65.1% of the voting-age public was registered, and 45.5% of these voting-age citizens actually voted (including 46.2% of women and 44.8% of men).

U.S. Census Bureau, 2011

Misc Source

A 2012 study by the Center for Responsive Politics revealed that only 0.36% of the U.S. population 18+ has actually contributed $200 or more to a political candidates' campaign. 

Center for Responsive Politics, 2012