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Sales Tip - 4 Lessons From a Failed Sales Call

You've never made a mistake. Every sales call you've made has always been perfect, so this is not for you, but I will ask you to read it anyway.

Reason is simple: You probably know someone who is not as perfect as you and, therefore, needs to know this.

Read it for them. The salesperson you save may just be the one you love.

I will admit I have blown more than my fair share of sales calls and I have learned a few lessons along the way.

Here are four of those lessons:

1. Disastrous sales calls are never as disastrous as we think.

For some reason, each time I've blown a sales call, I'm thinking to myself how the customer must think I'm an idiot. No, not really. The vast majority of time, they don't even have a clue it's a blown sales call.

2. Just because a customer rejects you doesn't mean you can't reach out to them again.

Rejection becomes very personal, and thus when a customer rejects you, it feels permanent. No, quite the contrary, but only if you're wiling to re-engage the customer again.

3. One bad sales call doesn't mean the next sales call is going to be bad unless you want it to go bad.

Our mental state of mind is a key part of why we're successful or not successful.

4. Worst thing we can do is to allow a disastrous sales call to become contagious.

If it does, then you really do have a disaster on your hands. Let it go. Nobody's perfect, except some of you who are reading this purely to help out a friend.

In the end, the level of confidence you have going into a call is going to determine the level of success you have coming out.

As I look back on the disastrous sales calls I've had, the vast majority started out with me thinking they were going to be a disaster. Amazing how accurate we can be in our thinking!

Now that you've read the list, do your friend a favor and help them overcome the one or two listed that you feel they're guilty of doing.

Source: Sales/marketing consultant Mark Hunter